Book reviews, Social commentary

‘Fractured: Why our societies are coming apart and how we put them back together again’ by Jon Yates [review]

“The problem is not that we are different from each other; it is that we are distant from ‘the other’.” Jon Yates believes our country has a serious problem. It’s one which undermines our economy, democracy, security, well-being and health. Yates calls it the People Like Me syndrome (PLM for short).  It is ‘the villain… Continue reading ‘Fractured: Why our societies are coming apart and how we put them back together again’ by Jon Yates [review]

Book reviews, Ethics & Christian living

Spiritual resources for social activism

'Everyone thinks of changing the world, but where, oh where, are those who think of changing themselves? People may genuinely want to be good, but seldom are they prepared to do what it takes to produce the inward life of goodness that can form the soul.' Richard Foster Over the last few months, I have… Continue reading Spiritual resources for social activism

Book reviews

Sins of Fathers – by Michael Emmett [review]

Growing up, Michael Emmett suffered from the impact of both sexual abuse and having a father who was a career criminal. He was drawn into a chaotic life of crime, violence and drug use. He was eventually arrested and sentenced for 12 years for drug smuggling. Faith In prison, through the chaplaincy, he began a… Continue reading Sins of Fathers – by Michael Emmett [review]

Book reviews, Social commentary

What the Church can learn from addicts

In my last job, I was based in a church building which hosted a huge range of 12 Step recovery groups in its basement.  The most famous of these is Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), but there were also groups specifically for people struggling with many of the compulsive behaviours that Brand lists above. Disarming In my… Continue reading What the Church can learn from addicts

Book reviews, Theology & Church

Is the biblical God a misogynistic bully?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvd2MNT642Q Since lockdown I have listened to a lot of podcasts whilst out walking. One of my favourites has become Unbelievable which hosts debates on matters of faith and belief. The show attracts high profile authors and activists and often pits Christians against atheists. These debates could easily become pointless and bitter, like listening to… Continue reading Is the biblical God a misogynistic bully?

Book reviews, Social commentary

‘Beware of Pity’: an old story with a timeless message

"There are two types of pity. One, the weak-minded, sentimental sort, is really just the heart’s impatience to rid itself as quickly as possible of the painful experience of being moved by another person’s suffering.” The novel Beware of Pity was first published by Austrian novelist Stefan Zweig in 1939. I have just read the… Continue reading ‘Beware of Pity’: an old story with a timeless message

Book reviews, Films & music

Recreating Narnia: an open letter to Netflix

Dear Netflix, Congratulations on acquiring the rights to The Chronicles of Narnia. I am writing to share five thoughts on what Netflix needs to bear in mind to make the series a success. I cannot claim to know anything about producing films or TV series. But I do know about Narnia. Like millions of others, the… Continue reading Recreating Narnia: an open letter to Netflix

Book reviews

‘A House Built on Love’ by Ed Walker [Review]

Ed Walker worked in Darfur, Sudan with the Christian relief and development charity, Tearfund, before returning home to the UK with his wife, Rachel. They moved to Peterborough where Walker started working for a homelessness charity. The death of one of the residents provoked him to question the inadequacies of the system he is working… Continue reading ‘A House Built on Love’ by Ed Walker [Review]

Book reviews, Sport, Theology & Church

‘David Sheppard: Batting for the Poor’ – by Andrew Bradstock [review]

David Sheppard scored more runs in a single season and more centuries than anyone else in the history of Cambridge University cricket.  Such was his talent that he was selected for England’s 1950/51 Ashes tour of Australia at the end of his first year as a student. But, at the same time his sporting career… Continue reading ‘David Sheppard: Batting for the Poor’ – by Andrew Bradstock [review]